"As Alzheimer's disease progresses, the need to nurture, love and be loved increases." American Assoc Geriatric Psychiatrists

Alzheimer's Information

The Difference Between Alzheimer's and Dementia

There is often a great deal of confusion among patients, family members, the media, and sometimes even healtch care providers as to what the difference between dementia and Alzheimer's actually is.

In the simplest terms, dementia is a symptom, and Alzheimer's is the cause of that symptom.

When a person is diagnosed with dementia, this means they have significant memory and cognitive problems that may interfere with daily living. Many people are relieved with a doctor's diagnosis of dementia, thinking that it is less worrisome than Alzheimer's.

Occasionally, some causes of dementia are reversible, such as thyroid conditions or vitamin deficiencies. However, most causes are degenerative diseases of the brain that cannot be reversed. The most common cause of dementia, in 70-80% of all cases, is Alzheimer's disease.

As a person ages, the chances of developing Alzheimer's increases, with roughly 50% of people aged 85 and over being diagnosed with the disease. It is important to be aware that even though Alzheimer's is very common in later years of life, neither it nor dementia are a normal part of aging.

Read more: What is the Difference Between Alzheimer's and Dementia?

At Memorable Pets, we are highly dedicated to raising funds for Alzheimer's awareness and research, which is why a portion of the proceeds from each Memorable Pet goes toward Alzheimer's care. You can learn more about our selection of pets and how you can help at our website: memorablepets.com

How to Truly Listen to an Alzheimer's Patient

In this blog post we look to a wonderful article on Alzheimer's Reading Room about how to communicate and truly listen to patients with dementia and Alzheimer's. Two of the biggest problems that caregivers for Alzheimer's patients face are how to cope with a loved one who has dementia, and also, how to communicate with them.

It is so very important when you are dealing with a loved one with Alzheimer's to make sure that you are really listening to them; even if their words may seem nonsensical, or they are simply repeating phrases they say countless times a day. It is much easier to be frustrated or irritated and react immediately without really thinking, but one of the most important things to remember when caring for a loved one with Alzheimer's or dementia is to always be kinder than you feel.

Read the full article: How to Listen to an Alzheimer's Patient

At Memorable Pets, we are highly dedicated to raising funds for Alzheimer's awareness and research, which is why a portion of the proceeds from each Memorable Pet goes toward Alzheimer's care. You can learn more about our selection of pets and how you can help at our website: memorablepets.com

Caregivers' and Dementia Patients' Needs Left Unmet

A recent study by John Hopkins Medicine reports, rather unsurprisingly, that 99 percent of people living with dementia and 97 percent of caregivers have unmet needs (varying from medical needs and safety, to emotional needs and resources).

Another finding in this study is that 60 percent of dementia patients were left without medical care for health conditions either related or unrelated to their dementia. This is rather notable, as patients with dementia are at an increased risk for other serious illnesses which may require hospitalization.

One disheartening part of the study also revealed that over half of the surveyed dementia patients felt they were not provided with adequate meaningful daily activities at their senior center or at home, and were still without a proper dementia evaluation or diagnosis.

The stress on caregivers and their own unmet needs also correlated with higher nursing home admissions for people with dementia. Many caregivers lack access to resources and support services, as well as education on how best to care for a loved one.

In both caregivers and dementia patients, it was found that those suffering from depression or its symptoms had significantly higher levels of unmet needs.

Read more: The Unmet Needs of Dementia Patients and Caregivers

At Memorable Pets, we are highly dedicated to raising funds for Alzheimer's awareness and research, which is why a portion of the proceeds from each Memorable Pet goes toward Alzheimer's care. You can learn more about our selection of pets and how you can help at our website: memorablepets.com