"As Alzheimer's disease progresses, the need to nurture, love and be loved increases." American Assoc Geriatric Psychiatrists

Alzheimer's Information

A Must Read Book If You Are Caring For Someone with Dementia!

 Dementia care expert, Rachael Wonderlin, has written a concise, very informative, straight forward book on the challenges of caring for someone with dementia.

I am very impressed with the practical advice Rachael has shared to make the person's life living with dementia more fulfilled and happier and the caregivers life much easier! The important emphasis of her book is to embrace and understand the reality of your loved one with dementia. Also, how you can better relate to their world, without judgement or alienation, recognizing that it is not their fault.

Her real life examples within each section / topic are filled with compassion (some made me tear up a bit) and understanding of the reality of the person living with dementia. I only wish I had this book when I cared for my beloved mother for eleven years!  

Rachael's book is part of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine's 36 Hour Day Books and comes highly recommended by Dr. Peter V. Rabins, MD, MPH.

Her book is now available for purchase on Amazon and Barnes & Noble online AND also now in stores.

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_1_17?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=rachael+wonderlin&sprefix=Rachael+Wonderlin%2Caps%2C196&crid=37BFDR93P58UY

Rachael holds a Master’s in Gerontology from UNC, Greensboro and a Bachelor’s in Psychology from the University of Mary Washington. She been working, interning, and volunteering in long-term care environments since 2005. 

It is obvious that Dementia Care is Rachael's passion and expertise! 

Rachael is also the author of the popular blog  "dementia by day"  where she is available for consulting work, tips, advice, or just a chat on the phone.

www.dementia-by-day.com

I personally rely on Rachael as a consultant for Memorable Pets & Believable Babies. Rachael was the original creator of the "Pet Shops" we offer, utilizing our Memorable Pets in "life enrichment stations" in the field of professional memory care within dementia care communities!

     

Rachael is so smart, creative and resourceful !

 

 

Spending Days Out with Your Loved One with Dementia

Now that spring has finally arrived and the weather is warming up, outdoor activities like picnics, nature walks, swimming, and just spending the day out and about are in season. If you're caring for a loved one with Alzheimer's, it can still be very possible and rewarding to plan trips and public activities that you will both enjoy.

This article on Dementia Challengers gives wonderful suggestions for places you can visit with your loved one and things you (and your family) can do together that will ease the stress and anxiety that often accompanies dementia.

Read more: Dementia Challengers: Days Out

At Memorable Pets, we are highly dedicated to raising funds for Alzheimer's awareness and research, which is why a portion of the proceeds from each Memorable Pet goes toward Alzheimer's care. You can learn more about our selection of pets and how you can help at our website: memorablepets.com

Persuading Your Loved One with Alzheimer's to Move into a Nursing Facility

Our blog today takes a look at a very informative and helpful article written by Marie Marley, award-winning author of Come Back Early Today: A Memoir of Love, Alzheimer's and Joy.

In this article, Marley shares advice and different methods of helping to convince a loved one that full-time care at a nursing facility is the best thing for them. Many times, especially in mid to late stages of Alzheimer's when social withdrawal and the desire for physical isolation is prevalent, patients tend to want to remain on their own in their own homes for as long as possible, and are frequently unaware that they need full-time care.

Moving a loved one into a care facility full-time is particularly agonizing for the caregiver, and many family members in caregiving roles suffer extreme guilt for making the decision to place their loved one in a nursing home. It is necessary, however, for caregivers to remember how important their own mental and emotional is, and also, that sometimes the most loving and best choice for a loved one is easing them into full-time permanent care away from home.

For spouses who act as the caregiver to their partner, the decision is a very challenging one. "I often work to convince reluctant spouses to change from being a 'caregiver' to being a 'care advocate,'" says William G. Hammond, founder of the Elder and Disability law firm in Overland Park, Kansas. "They can then be vigilant to ensure their loved one is receiving appropriate treatment in the facility while preserving their own health."

Read more: Convincing a Loved One With Alzheimer's to Move to a Nursing Home

At Memorable Pets, we are highly dedicated to raising funds for Alzheimer's awareness and research, which is why a portion of the proceeds from each Memorable Pet goes toward Alzheimer's care. You can learn more about our selection of pets and how you can help at our website: memorablepets.com

Positive Approach to Coping with Alzheimer's Caregiving

"Promoting skills to cope with Alzheimer’s is increasingly important", says nationally known Alzheimer's disease expert Teepa Snow. In this Q&A with the Sun Sentinel of Fort Lauderdale, FL, Snow talks a bit about her Positive Approach method for both patients and their families to help them cope with Alzheimer's disease.

Snow explains that "people with Alzheimer’s are trying to deal with what they have lost. We need to take a step back and realize they aren’t crazy. Our job is to figure out the reason why they are doing what they do, then modify or change things to make the situation better."

Snow, also an occupational therapist, trainer, and educator, became interested in Alzheimer's after her grandmother was diagnosed with the disease, and says she has always been drawn to people with unique challenges, and finds joy with them.

When asked how it might be possible to associate a word like 'joy' with a devastating disease such as Alzheimer's, Snow said that the most important thing is to find a special moment with your patient or loved one and celebrate it.

Believing active social interaction with other people to be an important factor in improving brain health, Snows also adds that "nurturing something, like caring for animals or plants, seems (helpful)."

Read more: Learning to approach Alzheimer’s caregiving in a positive manner

At Memorable Pets, we are highly dedicated to raising funds for Alzheimer's awareness and research, which is why a portion of the proceeds from each Memorable Pet goes toward Alzheimer's care. You can learn more about our selection of pets and how you can help at our website: memorablepets.com

Don't Ask Me What I Had for Breakfast: A Short Film About Memory Loss

The New York Memory Center put together a short film in early 2013 illustrating how important staying active and engaged in social care is for Alzheimer's and dementia patients.

Participating in the arts, such as music, painting, dancing, and yoga, can slow the effects of memory loss and possibly prove more effective in certain patients than available medications for Alzheimer's.

The film focuses on Ola Hightower, whose dementia most significantly affects her short-term memory, and her daughter and caregiver, Allyson Hightower. Allyson notes the positive mood and behavioral changes in her mother after she began regularly attending her memory center.

"I can remember things that happened years ago," Ola said, when asked how her good her memory was, "but don't ask me what I had for breakfast this morning."

Read more: Don't Ask Me What I Had For Breakfast

At Memorable Pets, we are highly dedicated to raising funds for Alzheimer's awareness and research, which is why a portion of the proceeds from each Memorable Pet goes toward Alzheimer's care. You can learn more about our selection of pets and how you can help at our website: memorablepets.com

Pets with Dementia

In an article from Alzheimer's Reading Room, Elaine Pereira recounts how sudden and significant changes in her 16-year old cat's behavior led her to believe pets can exhibit symptoms of dementia in ways very similar to people.

She first noticed the difference in her cat, Snoopy, when he began to howl loudly and unceasingly for seemingly no reason at all. After doing some online research about cat howling, Pereira discovered that the cause was cat senility, which is essentially a kind of dementia in pets.

“Cats, just like people, can suffer from a form of mental confusion, or cognitive dysfunction, as they age. They become disoriented and often cry plaintively for no apparent reason, especially at night.”

Read more: Our Pets Get Dementia Too

At Memorable Pets, we are highly dedicated to raising funds for Alzheimer's awareness and research, which is why a portion of the proceeds from each Memorable Pet goes toward Alzheimer's care. You can learn more about our selection of pets and how you can help at our website: memorablepets.com

The Relationship Between Pets and Dementia Patients

When bringing real pets or stuffed animals around their loved ones with dementia or Alzheimer's, caregivers often notice a positive change; many times their patient will become happier and more talkative, perhaps even telling the animals things they won't even tell their caregivers.

A study conducted by a group of researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital showed that similar areas of the brain are activated when women viewed pictures of their children and their own dogs.

“Pets hold a special place in many people’s hearts and lives,” says Lori Palley, DVM, of the MGH Center for Comparative Medicine, co-lead author of the report. “There is compelling evidence from clinical and laboratory studies that interacting with pets can be beneficial to the physical, social and emotional wellbeing of humans.”

Read more: The Role of Pets in Dementia Care

At Memorable Pets, we are highly dedicated to raising funds for Alzheimer's awareness and research, which is why a portion of the proceeds from each Memorable Pet goes toward Alzheimer's care. You can learn more about our selection of pets and how you can help at our website: memorablepets.com